Monthly Archives: July 2012

22 week appointment and light kick from baby A

22 week appointment and light kick from baby A

Steve and I just got back from our 22 week appointment.  It was a waste of time… quickest appointment ever.  peed in a cup, saw the doctor, asked a few questions, heard the heart beats… and we were done.  We didn’t even get to see them.  Baby A’s heartbeat was 160 bpm and baby A’s was 155.  I had gained 4 pounds since my last appointment for a total so far of about 14 pounds.  My belly measurement was 24 inches so i’m measuring 2 weeks ahead.

Anyways, when we got back to the office i swear I felt baby A from the outside for a few kicks (or punches).  It felt like someone was flicking me from inside.  Maybe it’s baby A!!

Twin Tentative Timetable

Twin Tentative Timetable

Found this article about twin pregnancies:

You’ve seen the pregnancy calendars (40 weeks’ worth). You might have estimated your due date (40 weeks from LMP). But before you circle that due date with a permanent red marker, consider this: A twin pregnancy is considered full-term at 37 weeks. (Three fewer weeks of heartburn and puffiness — whew!)
Happily, by 37 weeks, your babies will have fully mature lungs and will likely be able to leave the hospital safe and sound within a few days. But just as 95 percent of all singleton births fail to fall on their due date, you shouldn’t count on your D-day hitting the 37-week bull’s-eye either. If your pregnancy ends up going past your estimated due date (EDD), your practitioner might likely induce at 38 weeks, maybe longer, depending on how you’re progressing. (It’s a good idea to have an “end-game” discussion with your practitioner long before week 37, since many doctors differ on how they typically handle the latter stages of twin pregnancy.)

More typical for multiples, however, is that the pregnancy will end up being shorter than full-term singletons — and many multiple moms-to-be find themselves in a race with the calendar, trying to maintain the pregnancy long enough to ensure healthy outcomes for the babies. Here are some multiple-pregnancy milestones:

  • The first major milestone is 24 weeks: the threshold of viability. Babies born this early will likely spend at least three months in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), and a third of them will survive with no long-term problems.
  • The second milestone is 28 weeks, when viability skyrockets. Ninety percent of babies who make it to this stage of gestation survive. Long-term complications — including cerebral palsy, vision and breathing problems — are still a possibility, however.
  • The next milestone is 32 to 34 weeks. Babies born now generally have an excellent chance of survival, without any major long-term complications, though they might not have full lung maturity (which generally occurs between 33 and 37 weeks) and will need to spend time in the NICU.  Some babies born at this stage may require oxygen to help them breathe, while others may need to be fed through a nasogastric tube (which runs through the nose into the stomach). “Super-twins” (triplets or more) almost always spend time in a NICU, but if you can get past that 32-week mark, chances are excellent that the babies will be healthy.

To ensure that your pregnancy — and your babies’ growth and maturity — is on the right track, your practitioner will probably order a barrage of tests as the end of your pregnancy approaches (generally at around the 32-week mark, when all is well). You can expect nonstress tests, biophysical profiles, or even late-stage amniocentesis to check for lung maturity and other indicators of how the fetuses are developing. Depending on the test results, your practitioner may decide to deliver your babies early or leave them cooking in the womb a little longer.

taken from http://www.whattoexpect.com/pregnancy/twins-and-multiples/giving-birth/your-tentative-timetable.aspx

Baby names

Baby names

I haven’t the slightest clue how we’re supposed to come up with TWO baby boy names.  Steve and I talked about names for a few minutes the night of the gender reveal but haven’t talked about names since.  We have so much going on and the babies feel like they’re so far away that names aren’t the highest priority right now.  Steve and I both like how our names are common so it’s easy for people to spell and understand them…. so our goal is to do something traditional for the twins as well.

I thought it’d be fun to put down my running list in a blog post.  Feel free to comment if you have suggestions on names to add to the list:

  • Anthony
  • Caleb
  • David
  • Damon
  • Derek
  • Elijah
  • Ethan
  • Gabriel (Gabe Oscar DeLuca! hahaha… *jokes*)
  • Lucas
  • Maxwell
  • Owen
  • Oscar (middle name)
  • Reid
  • Scott (middle name)
  • Sean
  • Vincent
  • Zachery

Names are tough as each person has different associations based on individuals that they have known in their life.  Makes it hard to get everyone to love a name…. but that’s okay… only Steve and I have to love the names for now.  For the rest of you, whatever we pick will grow on you as these little boys steal your hearts!

Ultra sound – anatomy v2

Ultra sound – anatomy v2

As I mentioned in a previous post I had to go back to get another picture of baby B’s spine because the pictures they took during the first anatomy scan weren’t clear enough.  I went in today and got to see both babies, still boys.  Baby A’s heartrate was 154 and B was at 143.

I’m a little worried because baby A flipped around to the breach position.  I know there is a lot of time until their due date but I felt more relaxed knowing they were both heads down.  If either is in breach the chances of us needing a c-section are high.  A c-section is required if if baby A is in a breach position.